What Does Meth Look Like?

Methamphetamine is often imagined as crystal-like, hence the term crystal meth. The reality is, meth also comes in varying colors and forms. An overview of the various appearances of meth and how to get help for addiction is seen through this post.

Drugs get their street names mostly for what they look like. For example, heroin is a powdery-white or brown type of drug, and it was given the street names White Horse, China White, and Brown Sugar among many others. Marijuana, on the other hand, is a greenish-brown looking plant when packaged, thus it has street names such as Weed, Grass, Broccoli, or Jolly Green.

Street Names For Meth

Meth also has its own list of street names. Since the majority of its users take the drug in its crystalline form, it has earned the following popular nicknames:

  • Crystal
  • Glass
  • Ice

Additionally, this drug also has nicknames that refer to its effects. Since meth produces a long-lasting high and users are known to be “speed freaks” when it comes to driving, this drug also has street names such as:

  • Crank
  • Speed
  • Zoom
  • Zip
  • Yaba (Thai term which means ‘Danger’)

Now that we understand how meth street names are related to its appearance and effects, below are descriptions of the common forms of meth along with information on how to get help for addiction.

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What Does Methamphetamine Look Like?

Younger first-time users or curious individuals may wonder, “What does meth look like?” and quite understandably so. Some forms of the drug may look similar to others, and you may want to distinguish meth from other substances for safety reasons. Here are the most common forms of meth:

Powdered Meth

This type of methamphetamine is either tablet or crystal form that has been crushed finely. They can appear translucent or even white, which either looks like confectioner’s sugar or crystal sugar. This type of meth can be challenging to distinguish from powdered cocaine or heroin form because of its appearance unless it comes with a different color.

Since meth is prepared using pseudoephedrine tablets which are red, the powdered form may also come as pink meth or even brown. The reddish tint of the tablet becomes dissolved giving the brownish or pinkish tint. In some instances, meth is turned into a blue powder drug, where manufacturers add a bluish food coloring to mimic a “pure” appearance.

Powdered meth is often snorted or mixed with alcohol or water to be injected. The larger surface area of powdered meth is sometimes favored by users due to its quick effects.

Crystal Meth

If there’s an appearance where meth is known for, it would be its crystalline form. This is because many consider crystal meth to be the purest form of the drug, without any additives, coloring, or residue. What does crystal meth look like? The crystal form of meth is similar to small chunks of translucent crystal, bits of ice, or coarse rock salt. Those who are curious to know what color is meth in this form would see that it is similar to a clear, grayish-white, or bluish-white appearance.

This form of meth is often smoked. A glass pipe is used and then the vapors are inhaled to be absorbed in the bloodstream. Others add meth to water, juice, or other beverages to make an energy-boosting drink. Some people also use empty gelatin capsules and place a little bit of the crystal meth inside to be swallowed.

When meth is smoked, there’s a residue that can stain the glass pipes or surfaces where users stay in. What does meth residue look like? It can be described as brown or black spots or stains in the walls. Meth manufacturing labs can also have this residue when the substance is “cooked” for long periods of time.

Methamphetamine Tablets

Methamphetamine also comes in a prescription form, popularly known as the brand Desoxyn. It is often used to treat symptoms of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) for improving focus and memory. Some users and sellers may try to fake prescriptions and smuggle this drug, allowing meth tablets to be sold in the black market.

Prescription meth tablets come in white circular tablets. However, some illegal meth labs can also create their own versions of the meth tablets. Some “cookers” can turn the tablets into varying colors to make them look attractive for the younger buyers.

Liquid Meth

What is liquid meth? A less common but recognized form of this drug is its liquid appearance. Many users think of the liquid form of meth when they have dissolved the powdered drug in water or alcohol. This is either ingested with a beverage or taken intravenously via a syringe.

When meth is dissolved, it is usually clear in appearance. Smuggled versions of liquid meth can appear yellowish or light brown with a syrup-like consistency. It is shipped in familiar-looking bottles to disguise its appearance, and users burn it later on to expose its crystal form. Some users prefer the liquid form, taking it orally or intravenously.

Symptoms Of Crystal Meth Use

Abusing crystal meth has several short-term and long-term effects. If you suspect that a loved one is using meth or you are a user wanting to know more about meth addiction, below are the symptoms you need to look out for:

Physical symptoms

  • Weight loss
  • Dental problems (tooth decay, bad breath)
  • Breathing problems
  • Skin sores
  • Seizures

Psychological symptoms

  • Insomnia
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Incoherent communication
  • Personality changes

Behavioral symptoms

  • Violent behavior
  • Unusual aggression and irritability
  • Disproportionate rage
  • Excitability

Long-time meth users may also display various health problems related to use, such as liver, kidney, heart, lung, or neurological issues.

Getting Help

Going through a drug addiction can feel isolating–but do know that there is help available. Many would see recovery as a huge undertaking, but it is usually the small steps you take that will help you succeed in addiction treatment. Here is a guide on how you can take these easy steps towards being addiction-free:

Step 1: Contact a high-quality meth rehab facility

An ideal meth rehab center is one that is patient-centered and has various treatment programs that will suit your needs. Addiction specialists in great rehab facilities will also answer your questions about rehab, detox, insurance, and other issues surrounding treatment.

It is never 100% safe to detox or quit drugs abruptly by yourself. Some withdrawal effects can be deadly, and require you to have professional monitoring in order to ensure that your vitals are steady throughout the process.

Step 2: Inform trusted family and friends

The second step in getting support is letting someone you trust know that you’re seeking addiction treatment, or admitting to your addiction. If you can’t get the help you need, your loved ones may have the resources to support you in this decision. Do understand that families and friends play a big role in your recovery journey. Opening up to them can help you create a community that helps you avoid addiction triggers and lead you toward long-lasting abstinence from drugs.

Step 3: Stay aware

It is also helpful to know more about meth addiction, or drug addiction in general. Being aware of the long-term health effects and how it causes damage in your life can help you to stay strong during recovery. There are various government sources, and also addiction specialists who are willing to guide you in addiction treatment.

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The appearance of Meth? The Look Of Danger

In retrospect, it is interesting to note that one of the street names of meth, “Yaba”, recognizes its potential for danger. Although some forms of this drug may appear ‘pure’ to users, there is nothing pure with abusing meth. Meth addiction brings devastating consequences on a person’s health, relationships, and overall life.

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Medical disclaimer:

Sunshine Behavioral Health strives to help people who are facing substance abuse, addiction, mental health disorders, or a combination of these conditions. It does this by providing compassionate care and evidence-based content that addresses health, treatment, and recovery.

Licensed medical professionals review material we publish on our site. The material is not a substitute for qualified medical diagnoses, treatment, or advice. It should not be used to replace the suggestions of your personal physician or other health care professionals.

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